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Lacie 4 Pin DIN Prong Stuck

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  • Lacie 4 Pin DIN Prong Stuck

    This is the hard drive, http://www.lacie.com/uk/support/supp...t.htm?id=10240

    The problem is that one of the 4 pin prongs on the power cable snapped inside the hard drive, and is now stuck in the power adapter.
    The attached image shows the problem.

    I dont know if there is ANYTHING out there that can possiblly pull it out, or any other way of retrieving the data(the data is invaluable, lots of music and school work, CV's etc).

    This happened when moving the hard drive from house to house, I'm guessing when it was carried it got bashed around a bit. I can get a new cable for it, but there must be some way of using the drive, as the electronics in it are still intact.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated,
    Thanks
    Attached Files
    Your order has been dispatched!

  • #2
    Hmm.

    What about sticking a small wire, or a part of a needle, into the slot where the broken pin was, to replace the missing part? There are ceartain kinds of glue which are conducting electricity.

    If I got you right, it need not be a good solution, just enough to backup your data. And HDD space is so cheap nowadays.

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    • #3
      I was actually thinking of soldering it then trying to pull it out, and get a new cable. Been asking a lot of people and thats been the most reccomended approach. Will look around for the tools

      And yes you are right, I dont mind if the hard drive died afterwards(Although keeping it would be a bonus), just as long as the data can be taken off it.
      Your order has been dispatched!

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      • #4
        Well if you need to get the stuff off, one solution for that drive is to wrench open the caddy, since they're just standard seagate ide drives inside anyway (to my knowledge), then plug it into your computer as a slave

        (The one I had of that model the power switch was really bad and rarely booted up the drive first go)
        [E.D.G]Chief

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        • #5
          This hard drive has no screws, and no concieveable way of opening it up. The only openings are little flaps on the bottom to let the air out. I'll definetly try that though...thanks
          Your order has been dispatched!

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          • #6
            It works!

            Used a knife to open the chassis, and it was indeed a very-clean Seagate IDE hard-drive. I just removed all the screws and then stuck it in the computer, the actual drive itself is not damaged and runs fine and all the data has been retrieved. Thanks guys
            Your order has been dispatched!

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            • #7
              Yeah I knew there weren't any screws, thats where the word 'wrench' came into it Glad that you got your data DiP.
              [E.D.G]Chief

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              • #8
                If you still want to get the pin out, I know a private who can suck a golf ball through a garden hose.
                ..it's safer here.

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                • #9
                  The chassis is pretty much useless. I'll keep it just in-case, but I'll just keep the hard-drive inside the PC. When I originally asked dad about this, he said it was a bin-job. So glad it all got sorted
                  Your order has been dispatched!

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                  • #10
                    Although this problem has been answered, I have an alternate solution that costs...free.

                    I ran into this problem. One of my pins broke off into the female connection of my HD. The problem was that I had a school project that was due the next morning, no backup and a laptop. If I'm correct, one would need a desktop to slave the external drive to their computer.

                    The only solution I had was to find a way to get the pin out of my drive and I figured out a way to do it.

                    ---

                    The female slots that the pins fit into, luckily, are somewhat wider and deeper than the circumference and length of the pins. So:

                    1) Find a paper clip and bend it into a straight line.

                    2) With a sharp knife/blade, cut a groove about 2 cm from one end at a 45 degree angle (that is sloping toward the end of the paperclip). Be careful not to cut the groove too big as you don't want to get anything else stuck in the slot.

                    3) The groove should act as a fish hook so that when you slide the paperclip IN-to the hole it will cause no more friction than it normally does.

                    4) When you pull the paperclip OUT of the hole, the groove will catch the end of the pin and pull it out enough so that tweezers can do the rest of the job.

                    It took me only a couple tries for the paper clip to catch.

                    ---

                    This worked for me. If you are afraid of doing more damage than is already done, don't use this method. I Hope this helps another student that is in threat of failing a class!

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