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  • Network bridge connections question

    I just got a new computer and it comes with a integrated LAN jack. I also have a NIC from my old PC in there. Windows found them both and bridged them. but I only use one of the ports at a time becuase I only have one cable. but was wondering if I took another cable off of my router and put it in the 2nd LAN Jack, would the bridge double my connection and speed? or at least improve it?

  • #2
    Dual Channel Lan?
    For a single process, no, do not think this would improve connection speed. Maybe for two programs accesing the network, each using a seperate connection. But even there, the Computer resource usage to do this might negate any benefits, and may even make it worse. My knowledge is limited though, so take with a grain of salt.

    My reasoning is thus:

    I assume that to the router, your connections are seen as two different devices/addresses. When your computer takes part in network communications, it chooses one path and all the data is sent through path. Even if the data made use of both paths, it would not make any difference. The same data would be going down both paths. For this to work, you would need special software/hardware. Suspect that to be expensive. Never heard of such things myself, but may exist. Even then, you are limited by the weakest link. Your computer may have high bandwith, but what about the rest of the network?

    Out of curiousity, what is your application, and are you noticing significant bandwith limits on your home network ( I am assuming it is a home network)? If so, would check other aspects of system, starting with your router. Cannot think of anything a typical home network would encouter that would noticably load the system. Using graphics workstation (file sizes of about 1 gigabyte), my experience is the communications hardware is the limiting factor, not the connection speed.

    My understanding anyway.
    Give some taffer fire, and you'll keep him warm for the night with one less reason to cause trouble for the master.
    Set a taffer on fire, and he will be warm for the rest of his life, and have no need to bother the master.

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    • #3
      No, not at all.

      Reasoning:

      1. One LAN connection will be faster than your total internet speed so there will be no improvement there.

      2. File transfer over your network will be only as fast as the slowest connection(which would be one LAN connection to any other computer on the network).


      My suggestion would be to pull out your pc card and use the onboard LAN instead as one shouldn't be any faster than the other.
      Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia, n. See also Irony.

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      • #4
        well then if it doesn't help anything, I dont see much point of the bridge being auto created, unless of course its just for simplicity for applications to find any connection and use it, regardless of which one is up. I think ill do some testing . Thank yu for your help.

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        • #5
          I just thought of an actual benefit for having two LAN connections: If you use one connection for net only and one for LAN only you have two independent connections so maxing out your LAN won't have any effect on your net connection.

          But, if the connections are shared this probably won't work out that way.
          Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia, n. See also Irony.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Salvage
            No, not at all.

            Reasoning:

            1. One LAN connection will be faster than your total internet speed so there will be no improvement there.

            2. File transfer over your network will be only as fast as the slowest connection(which would be one LAN connection to any other computer on the network).


            My suggestion would be to pull out your pc card and use the onboard LAN instead as one shouldn't be any faster than the other.
            Ok, Hypothetically speaking, what about 2 seperate Cable Modem accounts? same company, but 2 seperate modems. one in each ethernet jack, then bridged. Would that double the speed ? or would there be collision problems?

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            • #7
              For a single application it would not, for reasons I mentioned above. However, for two different applications, it may show noticable differences. For example, say one connection is being used for a server, and the other connection is being used for downloading some file. In that case, two connections might be of use. Assuming the computer can handdle the necessary processing, would expect to see a performance boost there. Do not expect however to see a performance boost if you try downloading a single file with the two the connections. All you could do is download twice. The file will split hte data along the two channels.

              As for having two network cards, I believe there several applications where this is useful, One that comes to mind right now is one computer acts as a gateway to the rest of the network, adding security to the system. One side/channel talks to the outside world, the other the network.
              Give some taffer fire, and you'll keep him warm for the night with one less reason to cause trouble for the master.
              Set a taffer on fire, and he will be warm for the rest of his life, and have no need to bother the master.

              Comment

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