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Stopping the sound bug

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  • Bloody-Reaper
    replied
    You have to listen for the were the sound is strongest. If im in the Rectory, and i hear a day i can tell wheter is was downstairs or upstairs. In nostalgia, im able to hear wheter the thief is on the roof streching his bow or sitting right in front of the door. (Room next to special display room.)

    It's traning. Just as everything else. Try it. Btw. my system is a 4.1... I was also able to do it with a normal 2.1 system... Altough it's harder to tell if it's infront or behind you.

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  • Buho
    replied
    I have 4.0 surround. UT surround sound sucks. It's there, but I have the worst time determining direction (2D) of the sound. How the heck can you pinpint in 3D, Bloody? You have one speaker above you and one speaker below you? UT03 has phenominal surround sound. I can really pinpoint sounds in that game!

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  • LegalAssassin
    replied
    I've got the standard 2+1 system that game with my comp, but I can still pinpoint a taffer/guard in a second.

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  • Bloody-Reaper
    replied
    Originally posted by BiG_D
    Unless you have a good surround sound system. Then I hate you .
    I have.
    And with a little practice im able to pinpoint the location of a taffer... In all 3 dimensions.

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  • Kiech Bepho
    replied
    The sound engine is spectacular, for the most part. Until you put on headphones, that is, or have a good surround sound system. Then you can hear many things that you SHOULDN'T be able to hear. Such as footsteps from a far area of a house, or other noise from an underground area, that would be impossible to detect otherwise. I suspose that these could be mapping issues, but only in part. Many of these maps that propagate too much sound depend on thin walls/ceilings, but when you can hear someone creeping you should at least be fairly close to them.

    Kiech

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  • oRGy
    replied
    Originally posted by Kiech Bepho
    How do walls stop light from passing through? I know it doesn't work that well with 'portable' lights, but that only makes a wall glow, and doesn't continue traveling. If sound and light are similar to each other, then can we apply the same application here?
    Thats what the Thievery sound engine does, as far as I know. Played sounds, such as footsteps, sound effects etc, use the pathnode network to determine how loud they should sound, which makes for a more realistic effect.

    Except AmbientSounds, which don't. They're like "portable" lights in that respect, they travel through walls etc.

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  • Buho
    replied
    Originally posted by Slappy
    This doesn't address the original topic of the thread, which was more or less "how do you control how sound propagates in the current Thievery engine?" My answer is: I haven't the slightest clue. I'm not a mapper, I just dropped by this forum to see if there's anything interesting..
    Amen, brutha! This forum is about as interesting as a room full of braniacks taking a math test -- you never know who will go to the front and ask the teacher a really wierd question about a question next.

    If you need any more comments from the peanut gallery, just let us know!

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  • Slappy
    replied
    If I'm remembering my physics correctly, sound travels differently than light. Sound is caused by the molecules of the medium (air, water, walls, whatever) vibrating. Sound WILL travel through walls, however it's pitch/frequency/etc will be changed due to the properties of the material.

    Therefore I think Big_D's "raytrace sound method" will not yield realistic results. Of course we don't have realistic results now, and I have no idea if the Big_D method would be better or not.

    This doesn't address the original topic of the thread, which was more or less "how do you control how sound propagates in the current Thievery engine?" My answer is: I haven't the slightest clue. I'm not a mapper, I just dropped by this forum to see if there's anything interesting..

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  • BiG_D
    replied
    Bingo! My thinking exactly. And since the sound doesn't need to be painfully accurate, it should be possible just to calculate from the nearest pathnode.

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  • Kiech Bepho
    replied
    How do walls stop light from passing through? I know it doesn't work that well with 'portable' lights, but that only makes a wall glow, and doesn't continue traveling. If sound and light are similar to each other, then can we apply the same application here?

    Leave a comment:


  • BiG_D
    replied
    Originally posted by oRGy
    not sure what you mean with the raytracing sounds there, Big_D.
    What I mean is: when you you hit the build button for the level, it compiles raytrace data for the pathnodes (how far light would shine, as well as where it wouldn't shine), as well as lights etc. Then when you are playing, it can use this data to see how the sound should travel from that point. (ie. the sound can be heard in the same area that light would hit.) Once again, this probably is quite taxing on the engine, and hard to code. But it would work (I think).

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  • Kiech Bepho
    replied
    I am thinking 10 ft thick walls would do it. Of course, don't expect the level too look good or be playable...

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  • Buho
    replied
    Theatre has this problem -- bad. In the yard you can hear everything underground, and vice vera. Since there are pathnodes in the yard and in the crypts, and because the crypts are not that far underground (I'm guessing just a few feet between the ceiling and the grass), the sound propogation is using shortest-path and is picking routes through the ground instead of traversing normal pathnode paths? Is there a max distance between nodes variable attribute somewhere (so you have to add more nodes)? Or is the solution just to build thicker walls?

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  • oRGy
    replied
    not sure what you mean with the raytracing sounds there, Big_D. The thievery sound system uses the pathnodes automatically, so as long as your map is well pathnoded it should be fine.

    a problem that arises with ambientsounds, though, is that they use the normal Unreal sound (distance based) system. If you use DynamicAmbientSounds, they use the Thievery sound system.

    Another solution with ambientsounds is just to have them with a small radius and to be judiciously located...

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  • BiG_D
    replied
    Heres how I would do it (but it would probably kill the engine): when you compile the map, treat the pathnodes like lights and get all the raytrace data (brightness and radius would have to be experimented with). Then, ingame, when you make a sound, it takes the nearest pathnode, and uses its raytrace data to figure out how far the sound would travel. This would probably make it take years to compile the map, and most likely cause slowdowns in gameplay (not if all the raytracing is done during the build). But I think it might work. Maybe.

    I think the unreal engine already has code in place to raytrace sounds, too (or at least echos).

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